Tag Archives: food


by Caroline Vogt

Invest some time in yourself this year! My guide helps you transform your life with easy steps to do. The books and e-books are available in English and German on Amazon worldwide.    Amazon.com

cover E & G


Basic Human Rights

Posted by Colleen

Since it was Earth Day this past weekend I thought this was an appropriate time to post this article. Please read – what do you think?

Monsanto Has Violated the Basic Human Right to a Healthy Environment and Food

Judges at The Hague called on international lawmakers to hold corporations like Monsanto accountable.

By Katherine Paul / AlterNet

April 24, 2017


March Against Monsanto, Akron, Ohio
Photo Credit: bill baker/Flickr CC

“Most opinion tribunals have had a considerable impact, and it is now accepted that they contribute to the progressive development of international law.” —International Monsanto Tribunal Advisory Opinion, The Hague, April 18, 2017

On Tuesday, April 18, representatives of the Organic Consumers Association and our Regeneration International project gathered in The Hague, Netherlands, along with members of other civil society groups, scientists and journalists.

We assembled to hear the opinions of the five judges who presided over the International Monsanto Tribunal. After taking six months to review the testimony of 28 witnesses who testified during the two-day citizens’ tribunal held in The Hague last October, the judges were ready to report on their 53-page Advisory Opinion.

The upshot of the judges’ opinion? Monsanto has engaged in practices that have violated the basic human right to a healthy environment, the right to food, the right to health, and the right of scientists to freely conduct indispensable research.

The judges also called on international lawmakers to hold corporations like Monsanto accountable, to place human rights above the rights of corporations, and to “clearly assert the protection of the environment and establish the crime of ecocide.”

The completion of the Tribunal judges’ work coincides with heightened scrutiny of Monsanto, during a period when the company seeks to complete a merger with Germany-based Bayer. In addition to our organization’s recently filed lawsuit against Monsanto, the St. Louis-based chemical maker is facing more than 800 lawsuits by people who developed non-Hodgkin lymphoma after being exposed to Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide. As a result of recently-made-public court documents related to those lawsuits, pressure is mounting for Congress to investigate alleged collusion between former EPA officials and the timing couldn’t have been better for the Monsanto Tribunal to announce its opinions. But is time running out for us to hold Monsanto accountable—and replace its failed, degenerative model with a food and farming system that regenerates soil, health and local economies?

Citizens’ tribunals historically contribute to developing international law

The Monsanto Tribunal judges had barely finished delivering their opinions before Monsanto spit out the usual pablum, claiming to be committed to finding “real solutions” to the challenges of hunger, food security and the role of farmers to “nourish our growing world sustainably.”Monsanto to bury the truth about the health risks of Roundup.

In a statement issued by the biotech giant’s Global Human Rights Steering Committee (who knew?), Monsanto claimed the Tribunal was “staged by a select group of anti-agriculture technology and anti-Monsanto critics who played organizers, judge and jury.”

In fact, organizers of the Tribunal had no say in the judges’ final opinion. And the judges themselves are all independent, highly qualified lawyers and legal experts, recognized by the international legal community for their accomplishments and credentials.

In their Advisory Opinion, the judges didn’t directly address criticism of the Monsanto Tribunal specifically, nor did they address attempts to delegitimize citizens’ tribunals (which the judges referred to as “Opinion Tribunals”) in general. But the judges did outline what an Opinion Tribunal is mand is not, and why they are important:

Their objective is twofold: alerting public opinion, stakeholders and policy-makers to acts considered as unacceptable and unjustifiable under legal standards; contributing to the advancement of national and international law.

The work and conclusions of opinion tribunals are shared with all relevant actors and widely disseminated in the national and international community. Most opinion tribunals have had a considerable impact, and it is now accepted that they contribute to the progressive development of international law.

Judges: Monsanto violated basic human rights

As we wrote last year, the Monsanto Tribunal judges were asked to consider six questions, referred to as the “Terms of Reference.” During two days of testimony, the judges heard from 28 witnesses (representing about 15 countries) on matters relating to the six questions.

On four of those questions—whether or not Monsanto violated the right to a healthy environment, right to food, right to health, and right to freedom of expression and academic research—the judges concluded in all cases that yes, Monsanto’s activities have violated all of those rights. (Detailed answers to all questions are included in the Advisory Opinion.)

On the question of war crimes, related to Monsanto supplying Agent Orange to the U.S. military during the Vietnam War, the judges concluded:

Because of the current state of international law and the absence of specific evidence, the Tribunal cannot give any definitive answer to the question it was asked. Nevertheless, it seems that Monsanto knew how its products would be used and had information on the consequences for human health and the environment. The Tribunal is of the view that, would the crime of Ecocide be added in International law, the reported facts could fall within the jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court (ICC).

And that brings us to question six: Could the activities of Monsanto constitute a crime of ecocide, understood as causing serious damage or destroying the environment, so as to significantly and durably alter the global commons or ecosystem services upon which certain human groups rely?

Possibly—if ecocide were recognized as an international crime, under the Rome Statute. Because it isn’t, at least not yet, the judges could only add to existing calls for the International Law Commission to amend the Rome Statute to include ecocide on its list of international crimes.

On complicity in war crimes, the Tribunal judges wrote:

The Tribunal assesses that international law should now precisely and clearly assert the protection of the environment and the crime of ecocide. The Tribunal concludes that if such a crime of ecocide were recognized in international criminal law, the activities of Monsanto could possibly constitute a crime of ecocide. Several of the company’s activities may fall within this infraction, such as the manufacture and supply of glyphosate-based herbicides to Colombia in the context of its plan for aerial application on coca crops, which negatively impacted the environment and the health of local populations; the large-scale use of dangerous agrochemicals in industrial agriculture; and the engineering, production, introduction and release of genetically engineered crops. Severe contamination of plant diversity, soils and waters would also fall within the qualification of ecocide. Finally, the introduction of persistent organic pollutants such as PCB into the environment causing widespread, long-lasting and severe environmental harm and affecting the right of the future generations could fall within the qualification of ecocide as well.

International law has ‘failed woefully,’ but we have to hope

We can’t do justice here to the Tribunal judges’ 53-page Advisory Opinion. The Opinion, which include 120 citations, paints a detailed picture of how Monsanto violates human rights and ravages the environment, on a global scale. In their published Opinion, the judges call for changes in international law in order to give priority to human rights, over the rights of corporations, and to hold corporations accountable for violating human and environmental rights.

While according companies like Monsanto unprecedented rights and entitlements, international law has failed woefully to impose any corresponding obligation to protect human rights and the environment. However, it is beyond the scope of this advisory opinion to consider the breadth of reforms required to re-align the respective priorities of commercial and public interests that must be brought about under international law. Therefore, the Tribunal strongly encourages authoritative bodies to address the legal and practical limitations that currently confine the scope, content and ultimately the effectiveness of international human rights law.

As she wrapped up the April 18 press conference in The Hague, Tribunal Judge Françoise Tulkens said that while the judges’ work was done, the work of civil society has just begun.

“Now this Advisory Opinion is in your hands, it’s for you to use it. You, as in civil servants, as in lawyers and judges, if it’s possible . . .  maybe this Opinion will serve in the development of international law, and of course international law does develop under the impetus of civil society, so for that maybe we have to wait one year, two years, decades, maybe centuries, I don’t know, but we still have to hope that it’s possible.”

As we hope for international law to start holding corporations like Monsanto (or Bayer or Dow or Syngenta) accountable for the devastating consequences of their poisonous chemicals, we must also look for hopeful solutions for feeding the world’s growing population. Monsanto will have you believe that its failed GMO monoculture model provides those solutions—but increasingly, the world is wising up to that lie.

In 3 Big Myths about Modern Agriculture, David R. Montgomery, professor of Earth and Space Sciences at the University of Washington, says that conventional farming practices that degrade soil health undermine humanity’s ability to continue feeding everyone over the long run. Montgomery writes:

I no longer see debates about the future of agriculture as simply conventional versus organic. In my view, we’ve oversimplified the complexity of the land and underutilized the ingenuity of farmers. I now see adopting farming practices that build soil health as the key to a stable and resilient agriculture.

Do we have decades or centuries, as Tulkens suggests, for international law to crack down on Monsanto? Probably not, if climate scientists’ predictions are correct. But as humans with rights, and consumers with responsibility for our purchasing decisions, we can help fuel a Regeneration Revolution that can both cool the planet and feed the world—without poison.


posted by Caroline

I have below the recipe from a good friend AJ, Corvallis.

Image result for image chicken stroganoff


4-5 boneless, skinless chicken breasts – cubed

3 T melted butter

Pkg. dry Italian-style (Good Seasons) dressing mix. (.7 ounce)

1   6 oz. cream cheese (can use light)

1 can cream of chicken soup (or mushroom or celery)


1.) Put chicken, margarine and dressing mix in slow cooker, mix together and cook on low for 5-6 hours.

2.) Add cream cheese and soup and cook on high for another 1/2 hour or until heated through. Stir occasionally to mix and it will become creamy.

Serve with Rice and salad! Enjoy!

Optional: You can mix all ingredients together, pour over chicken and cover & bake

1  1/2 hours at 325 or 350 F or less if you don’t have a crock pot.






By Caroline

Image result for images family dining table

So many families struggle with time and time-management at home and at work. Helping people organizing, decorating and simplifying life is one of my passions.

The stress during the working-week with doing so many things for the family including shopping and cooking healthy food can be overwhelming.

1.) Make a fun family-evening or weekend to chose some healthy menu-recipes from cook-books and cooking-magazines and include your children in choosing.

2.) Look for balanced meals. Prepare ahead and cook. I recommend to look for 3 categories: for example: Meals with Pasta, Rice and Potatoes. Cook the portions you need for the weekly menus all at once.

3.) The same for veggies: for example: peas & carrots, broccoli/cauliflower, tomatoes

4.) The same for the meats: Chicken, beef, fish

5.) Wash the salads, prepare  and put in fridge, but no more than 1-3 days

5.) Make a copy  from the 7 menu-recipes for the week

6.) Copy or write the separate ingredients-shopping-lists for the recipe.

4.) File  them together to use another time. With a copy you save time in looking for recipes and writing the shopping list several times!

Use a weekend to cook the meals ahead for the week and make single portions for the evening or per person and freeze. If you write the days on the containers and stack them accordingly you have always the right day on hand when you come  home from work/school. Remember: 3 veggies (can be salads), 2 fruits a day to incorporate to your meals.

The benefits: 1.) No stress to find out what to eat each evening. 2.) No running after work in the store. 3.) Knowing  that your family eats a balanced meal a day.  4.) More time spending together as a family at the dinner table.





posted by Caroline

Image result for images tortillas of rice   find by Costco   (Gluten Free Products )

Brown Rice Tortillas and Oatmeal at Costco are great for people who can’t eat Gluten. Gluten-free choices for autistic children and adults, read more….Autism as well as children and people with celiac disease  read more……   Celiac disease.    Look up websites for Gluten-free products. Most stores have Gluten-free products, if not online shopping is a way to get the choices. Look also for Gluten-free Shampoos, skin care and toothpaste. Adhesives have also Gluten, this is something people don’t think about it usually.



Halloween is right around the corner. With this treat the children learn that a healthy Halloween treat tastes great!

posted by Caroline

green goblin vegan smoothie




Recipe from our friend of friendship-International group: Ching-Yue Chi, Taiwan  www.cmlcenter.org   (monthly International Potluck)


Image result for images, stir fried eggs with tomato, taiwan


5 eggs

1/4 t. salt

dash of black pepper

1 green onion, chopped finely

1 tomato, diced

1/2 t. sugar

1 T each: ketchup, water

1 t. cornstarch


1.) Beat eggs with salt and black pepper lightly and add the green onion, mix.

2.) Heat the wok then add 2 T. oil: stir-fry the tomato with onions and add sugar, ketchup, water, cornstarch. Stir briefly while the liquid thickens, remove. Clean the wok

3.) Reheat the wok, add 5 T oil. Hold the wok and rotate it to swirl the oil around the lower two-thirds of the wok. Turn the heat to high. Pour in the egg mixture and stir-fry until it becomes slightly firm: add the tomato liquid from the step 2.). Stir quickly to mix, do not overcook. Immediately transfer to a serving plate, serve and enjoy!